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SFGTV2
Dec 3, 2012 2:30am PST
building in the world and we have honors such as the greenest city in north america, the walkable city, and the best green policies, the green tech of north america and forbes recognized that san francisco has the most green jobs in the united states. that's jobs. that's one of the most important things we are doing for the whole country. [applause] and we are creating and sustaining jobs as well as supporting new industries in our city. our energy watch program creates or sustains 180 jobs a year. san francisco has now achieved 80% landfill diversion rate setting the national recycling and compost records as the high of any city in north america. [applause] and by the way as a former public works director you ought ton how proud i am. we have the best compost in the united states and in fact it's sold to all of the wineries in napa that make and produce the best wines in the world. our partners employs over a thousand green collar employees and solar sf resulted in hiring from employees from disadvantaged communities in the work force program. i want to acknowledge and thank green bui
LINKTV
Dec 13, 2012 11:00am PST
closest mar cityn north america is actuay vancouver. pacific rim immigration is well-established cnatown.r.it hd but in the run-up to '97, there are many upscale migrants, anthey are not moving to chinatown. geogeravid leys beening the city's changing lascape. ase obsees w usere, wcaseeast side of r vancouver is essenally split intowoections. e city's divided io two halves-- west and east. the east side s always been the e city's divided io two halves-- west and east. of non-english-speaking immigrants-- some from europe, some from asia, buworking-class ople. and the landscape we see belows sis landscape of small houses, and the houses are very sie. and the landscape narrator most of the immigrant communities are cad which s siof nghoo thatrelmost concealed beneath the urban forest narrator: it is here in this greener, more affluent part of the city where the new asian elites have chosen to live. ma os ies are children of hong ko businessmen. their parents continue tol ma os ies in the asian omanufacturing industry. theyften commute between vancouver and hong kong. they believe t
LINKTV
Dec 25, 2012 8:00am PST
with one the densest concentrations of drug addicts in north america. the portland hosts the only legal injection site in north america, a center that's come under fire from canada's conservative government. i asked dr. matÉ to talk about his patients. >> the hardcore drug addicts that i treat, but according to all studies in the states, as well, are, without exception, people who have had extraordinarily difficult lives. and the commonality is childhood abuse. in other words, these people all enter life under extremely adverse circumstances. not only did they not get what they need for healthy development, they actually got negative circumstances of neglect. i don't have a single female patient in the downtown eastside who wasn't sexually abused, for example, as were many of the men, or abused, neglected and abandoned serially, over and over again. and that's what sets up the brain biology of addiction. in other words, the addiction is related both psychologically, in terms of emotional pain relief, and neurobiological development to early adversity. >> what does the title of yo
PBS
Dec 21, 2012 4:00pm PST
north america editor reports. >> the church bells tolled out the exact time when a week ago a young man with an assault rifle began his massacre of children. they stood in prayer and in silence in the rain. in a town still numb, the bells tolled 26 times, one for each of the victims of the school. inside the white house, president obama and his staff since silent for a minute. beyond the grave, resolution. in a new video, he has promised he will push for a ban on assault rifles. >> i will do everything in my power as president to advance these efforts. if there's even one thing we can do as a country to protect our children, we have a responsibility to try. >> shame on the nra. >> there are those who blame the national rifle association for consistently, powerful lobbying against gun control. they have been consistently silent until now, and some expected they would seek compromise. none of it. instead, raw fury, blaming video games, the culture. >> we have blood-of films out there like "american psycho," "natural born killers." that are aired on saturday. fantasizing -- of killing
CNBC
Dec 22, 2012 4:00am EST
tibco? >> i am very confident of that, jim. we have strong leadership in north america. there were parts of north america where we had great strength. there were areas where we grew and we have to replicate that model across the board. last time i missed i went on to have 17 very strong quarters consecutively after that and the stock grew five-fold from that point in time. hopefully we can reproduce those results going forward. it was entirely our fault. it was bad execution. >> how are you able to do so well in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit
CNBC
Dec 21, 2012 6:00pm EST
call. what went wrong and how are you fixing it? >> well, jim, we failed to execute in north america in our core business. it was entirely our fault. no excuses. we have made a leadership change and that takes effect starting now. but there were parts of our business that were very strong. visual antilics were up. there's no question there is strong demand for our products. we failed to execute in certain areas. >> okay. there was one -- i know everyone knows the federal government is having a tough time. they seem to have spent less with you than they did previously. the federal government stiff you? what happened? >> it was bad execution. i can't blame anybody but myself. we had a greater than 90% drop in that business and that's just bad execution. but on the other side we were up 50% in the west. we were you were 50%, 60% in the south and in the northeast. so we had great strength in many areas but areas like the government, the center region, canada, latin america, we had poor execution. >> now, you do some work -- this is the first time i asked you about this. for the oil and gas
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
worth of projects because there is that much oil and gas in north america that needs to be sent to where it can be used? >> that's right, jim, in fact we know there's been a huge renaissance in oil production, not just in canada from the oil sands, but obviously in the united states, and that's fueling the need for more and more pipeline capacity. at the end of the day, connecting these markets from growing supply, with refinery markets and demand markets, means ultimately lower fuel prices for consumers. >> let's talk about that. if we were to use natural gas as a surface vehicle fuel and we got all the oil that you're talking about to the refineries, do we see a world where we could have gasoline back to $2.50? >> well, i'm not sure about $2.50, jim. ultimately the price of oil is determined on the world market, so we're probably going to be a ways away from 2.50, but what you will see is better connectivity between supply and demand. that will ensure efficient pricing. >> how does your business work? let's say a bunch of guys wanted to do railroads, a bunch of guys wanted to do
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or two or a stamp attached to legal documents, publications, and the packages of non-essential p
CNBC
Dec 20, 2012 5:00pm EST
million. subscribers in north america, though, he said, showed the largest decline. the number was 79 million down from 80 million, a quarter ago. that's important, pause the subscriber number is kind of a lagging number. as you see devices go down later on, you see subscribers go down. if they're still losing them in north america, that hasn't stabilized to strength is in emerging markets. they aren't going to be buying blackberry 10. are people going to switch off their iphones and android devices in america over to blackberry 10, that's what rim has to hope for. a question. is that a quarter on quarter comparison, in terms of declining the most or year on year? >> it is a quarter on quarter comparison. that's the context of what he was saying. subscribers actually increased year on year. >> okay, john, thank you for that. we'll get more from john on the conference call later on in the show. >>> meantime, all day, scott wapner has been counting down the worst trades of 2012. up next, he unveils the final name on the list. the worst trade of the year. >>> plus, we continue to brin
SFGTV2
Dec 8, 2012 8:30pm PST
us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the sa
ABC
Dec 10, 2012 11:00am PST
forecasts by 2030, asia will surpass north america and europe combined of global power based on gross domestic product growth, investment in technology. >>> president obama will make his first comments later today in detroit on his one-on-one talks at the white house yesterday with house speaker boehner to dodge that fiscal cliff. yesterday's mattering was the first since election day. mr. obama is expected to reveal details when he speaks to auto work there's afternoon. >>> "wall street journal" reporting hostess used employee pension money to stay afloat as it sank deeper toward bankruptcy. it isn't clear how much money was taken from the funds. today is the final day for bidders interested in taking overwhat is left of hostess to step forward. so far 160 companies have expressed interest which include wonder bread and twinkies. hostess closed last month. >> this morning the national transportation safety board confirms mexican-american singing superstar jenni rivera died from a plane crash yesterday she was one of seven onboard a private jet that went down in northern mexico. she w
CNBC
Dec 12, 2012 4:00am EST
think we are seeing supplies go up. north america, united states, canada, mexico, they've seen significant growth in oil supplies. this year one of the few areas, next year, for a few years to come. is it something that it creates supplies to flood the world's market? no. it's going to create supplies that the world market needs. if you think about the low level of automotive transportation, penetration and emerging markets, again, this longer term story, you'll add more oil coming out of the u.s. you get more demand coming. we're going to need every barrel. >> reporter: where is the price going in 2013? >> i think we'll be higher for brent, quite a bit higher for wti. and that's because we're going to see the narrowing of that brent/wti spread as the seaway pipeline comes on line. and those barrels start flowing at a cushion to the gulf. >> reporter: one last question. the fiscal cliff, we talk about it, historical, dollar down, commodities up. i see less bang for the buck on commodities, the more q.e. into the system. i'm not sure it's working. >> i think if we get more q.e.,
MSNBC
Dec 24, 2012 9:00am PST
sure that he has a safe and secure journey throughout the world and throughout north america in particular. >> sir, you do point out you have been tracking santa since the 1950s. one thing in modern daytime that you guys are doing now is you're on twitter. what's the response been to social media to the tracking of santa claus? >> well, right now on twitter we have over 110,000 people following santa, and on facebook we have over a million people following santa. since this morning we've been open since 6:00 eastern time, and as you can see behind me, there's a room, and there's many rooms in our norad track operation center. we've fielded more than 24,000 phone calls, and we are on track to be beat the record of last year where we have received over 102 phone calls. we're pretty busy, but we're very excited to be. >> it sounds very busy there. last but not least, where is santa right now in his travels, and what is his estimated time to basically be in north america area? >> well, right now we're tracking santa over russia, and as you know, he is going to be traveling over russ
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 6:00am EST
the southern frontier of the colony's. the french had been kicked out of north america in 1763 after the french and indian war, a seven years' war. there were a lot, a number of french people living in canada and great lakes area, but france was not much of a presence. they had been pushed out here that's what the french were so anxious to cause trouble for the british and to help the colonies by sending the money and ammunition. essentially, the french were not a force in north america at that time. >> you pointed out that among the six first president's, four from virginia and two from massachusetts. why was that? >> because those were the importance states at that time. they had been the. importance the when i say and the four importance once or massachusetts and connecticut, connecticut was more important for strategic reasons. virginia and south carolina in the south. virginia was the old dominion and had a big population, vary widely respected, enormous influence in terms of territory, because west virginia was expanding, so was conducted. they claimed the entire great la
FOX
Dec 25, 2012 10:00pm PST
religious freedom. >>> families in the south bay enjoying a winter wonderland tonight in north america. the entertainment included live shows and games. wonderland will stay at north america through january 4. children four years and under get in for free. >>> a lot of fresh new snow in the sierra tonight and an incredible example of human nature. a chain installers mission to return a lost wedding ring. >> chilling new details in the case of a fire. >>> at first, firefighters report of an an explosion in downtown san francisco. what they found on the scene. >>> a manhole cover exploded in downtown san francisco this evening. pg & e says it was caused by an underground vault fire. the blast happened around 5:00 this evening near the corner of third and mission street. the intersection was closed to traffic for a while as crews put out the fire. no one was injured and there was no power outages. >>> investigators have found a note and human remains at the home of a man who's accused of deliberately setting a fire and then shooting and killing two firefighters that arrived at the scene. david
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
colonies. the french had been kicked out of north america in 1763 after the french and indian war. while there were a lot, number of french people were living in canada and in the great lakes area. but france was not much of a presence. that is why the french were so anxious to cause trouble for the british and help the colonies by sending the money and ammunition. essentially, the french were not a force in north america at that time. >> you point up the from the six first presence we had, four of them were from virginia. >> those were the important states at that time. when i say that the four important ones were massachusetts, connecticut was more important for on strategic reasons, and virginia and south carolina in the south. but virginia was the old dominion and had the big population, vary widely respected. enormous influence in terms of territory because west for geneva was then in virginia, so was ky. they claimed the entire great lakes. and they were the oldest colony, dating back to 16 07. so they had a long history of being involved in things. the house of burgesses wa
KICU
Dec 25, 2012 11:30pm PST
enjoying a winter wonderland tonight in north america. the entertainment included live shows and games. wonderland will stay at north america through january 4. children four years and under get in for free. >>> a lot of fresh new snow in the sierra tonight and an incredible example of human nature. a chain installers mission to return a lost wedding ring. >> ch >>> a manhole cover exploded in downtown san francisco this evening. pg & e says it was caused by an underground vault fire. the blast happened around 5:00 this evening near the corner of third and mission street. the intersection was closed to traffic for a while as crews put out the fire. no one was injured and there was no power outages. >>> investigators have found a note and human remains at the home of a man who's accused of deliberately setting a fire and then shooting and killing two firefighters that arrived at the scene. david lee miller has the new details emerging on the man at the center of this attack. >> reporter: when firefighters arrived at the home of adam spangler they did not know they would be ambushe
SFGTV
Dec 25, 2012 2:30pm PST
year conduct alt contracts with the option to extend for two additional one year periods to arup north america limited and nelson nygaard consulting associate and stantec consulting services and this is an action item. >> before we take action, is there any member of the public who would like to speak on item? >> public comment is closed. >> could we take the house, same call? >> item passes. >> item seven? . >> authorize the ex-did i have director to execute an amendment to the memorandum of the agreement with the san francisco mun nis pal transportation agency for the van ness avenue bus rapid transit project to provide additional $208,862 in proeshted prop k funds to the sfmta bringing the sfmta's prop k budget to the total amount not to ex-see $349,362. >> is there any member of the public who would like to comment? >> seeing none, could we take the same in-house call. item passes. >> could you call number 8? >> appoint glen davis, aaron 2k3w0e8ds commission and christopher wadding to the citizen's advisory committee for two year terms. >> is is there any member of the public who w
SFGTV
Dec 18, 2012 6:00am PST
how our 100% green is more costly coming from shell north america and arguably the largest climate criminal and more green and pg&e product. that's called the same thing. if you think you can sell that -- well, i think you're going to need $5 million probably per person. it's just ridiculous. when you have a good product you don't need to spend millions of dollars to sell it. that's the bottom line. and you paid $400,000 to have people come and look at this and say "well, here are
CBS
Dec 8, 2012 7:00am PST
and north america. >> you made this butter sauce with what you saute'ed the mushrooms. >> you wipe it down a bit but then you leave it in the remnants right there. >> we boil about 15 minutes. what's in the butter sauce? >> butter, water, oregano. be careful when you make a butter sauce not to make too much because you don't want any left over in the pan when you are done. >> okay. we'll put this over some kale. look how pretty that is. we'll take some parmesan cheese right on top. we'll finish it off with a little bit of olive oil. >> give it some shine. >> look at how beautiful. >> steph. >> beautiful plate. >> love that. oh, get the forks. >> tonight there will be outdoor lighting in san francisco on the first night of hanukkah. the lighting ceremony has been happening in union square each december for the past 37 years. tonight's lighting happens at 5:00. that will continue for seven more nights. there is another lighting of the minora happening at 6:00 in gear deli square. in sports, a star pitcher who suffered a injury with a's has signed with another team. >> reporter: good
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 1:00pm EST
colonies and all of north america at the end of the 18th-century, and gradually northern states, northeast and mid-atlantic states abolished slavery but i realized this was a gradual process that took a long time. that what we discovered as there was leaves a new jersey in the 1860's, and most of the states that abolished slavery between c-17 80 and 1804 which is the period that we customarily look at had to do it again leader in the 19th century because there was so much ambiguity as to what the road from slavery to freedom was. so, thinking about that, i tried to then step back and say if this is the case what does this mean for how we should understand emancipation in the united states and the notion of sectionalism between freedom and slavery that organizes our understanding of american political history. so i've been arguing one of the essays in the look that slavery is national, and the communities of run away slaves should be understood by what we call marroons and people of dissent and what we call the northern states and the slaves and the southern states are important
Comedy Central
Dec 19, 2012 1:00am PST
right spacing for that. india, north america! well, don't think we won't detect your call center accents, india n.a. how are michigan's union members takintaking this news? >> prounion protesters are swarming the capital building in lancing. >> hey, hey, ho, ho, right to work has got to go. >> union busting is disgusting! (laughter). >> jon: dude, you're from michigan, detroit, "8 mile." you've got to come up with better rhymes that busting-disgusting if you want to win the khraoe climactic rap. you have to put effort into it. (laughter) (cheers and applause) look, you have one job at one factory, when you seize every benefit you could, yo, our palms are sweaty, knees week, arms heavy, working in a factory all day building chevys, like the volt, you plug it in, and then you win -- ecologically, because if it was an actual race you would not -- actually. you've got to dues collect for the unions oro bahts are going to come and take away our jobs or to the chinese kids with the tiny hands to work and go -- ♪ this of ha tunety comes once in a lifetime note? note yo! (cheers and ap
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 7:00pm PST
in north america, where there's a huge shale gas boom. they estimate by next year freeport will derive a little more than a quarter of its profits from energy and the rest from mining, versus 100% from mining today. the company says it thinks demand for commodities, especially energy, will continue to grow. that could help offset the increased difficulty mining companies are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and joins us from chicago. dan, how unique of a deal is this in the u.s. to have mining and energy drilling all in the same company? >> it is very unusual, forthe p. decades, ago, however, we had seen a lot of the oil majors, folks like amco, with exposure to mining as well. this is an animal we haven't seen in quite sometime in the u.s. >> tom: what drove the deal for freport, why did it want to go outside its expertise mining, that was two generati
SFGTV
Dec 28, 2012 11:00am PST
to go on a door step and explain some way or another how our 100% green is more costly coming from shell north america
Comedy Central
Dec 11, 2012 11:00pm PST
i didn't grab no shoes or nothing, jesus. i ran for my life. then the smoke got me. i got bronchitis. nobody got time for that. >> i definitely have time for that. keep up with our blog at tosh.com. buy stuff at our store but only if you want to. come see me on tour. f only if you want to. brickleberry is coming up. time for this week's spoiler alert. in this episode, steve dies. good night. oh, and we are moving to sundays at 1:00 p.m. see you then. (cheers and applause) captioning sponsored by comedy central (cheers and applause) >> jon: welcome to "the daily show"! my name is jon stewart! we've got a good one for you tonight. we've got a good one. our guest, laura linney. she's in the new movie in "hyde park on the hudson." daisy was apparently f.d.r.'s confidante at a time when confidante meant "guy i have sex with." (laughter) we begin tonight in michigan where ten months ago michigan's governor rick snyder -- (laughter). that's dee snyder. duke snyder. that's roy scheider. (laughter). (cheers and applause) that's just a picture of me looking aknowed with this bit. there we go. rick snyder. anyway, this (bleep) guy. michigan governor rick snyder went before congress ten months ago to say he was not particularly interested at this time in making the bedrock union state of michigan a right to work state. >> right to work is an issue that is a very divisive issue. people feel very strongly about it. we have many problems in michigan that are much more pressing that i want to find common ground issues we can work together on before we get into divisive issues. >> jon: (whispering) going to bring people together. (laughter) he was going to focus on common ground things people from michigan want and need. more robocoppers on the streets of new detroit. (laughter) getting the tourism board to work a little harder on its new slogan. (laughter) and finally -- (applause). finally michigan was going to fin their statue i have been petitioning for online. (laughter) they've got a rocky statue in philly, they should have a kid rock statue in detroit. that's some bull (bleep) right there. (laughter) none of that is done. he hasn't done any of it so -- >> moments ago the michigan house approved a right-to-work bill the state senate passed last week. >> jon: doesn't matter. your governor doesn't want to work on that divisive issue. >> republican governor rick snyder promises to sign the bill as soon as it hits his desk which could be within hours. >> jon: actually, between the time that we cut that soundbite and now he already signed it! so (bleep). (laughter) look, you know what, man? so what? so what? so this guy who really looks pleasant enough. (laughter) , maybe it won't be so bad. i mean, the phrase "right to work" is such a positive and uplifting message. what could it possibly do to organizations like unions that also supports workers rights. the law probably strengthens unions. >> it would make it illegal for unions and employers to mandate that employees be part of a union or pay any amount of money to that union. >> jon: or destroy the only leverage unions have to stay afloat, one or the other. so it's really a right-to-work around the union for the corporations. it's one of those things that are actually named for the opposite of the thing they do. like strip bars call themselves gentlemen's clubs. (laughter) or the t.v. network dedicated to making us stupider is called "the learning channel." (laughter) (cheers and applause) or a t.v. show that only airs four days a week calls it a daily show. (cheers and applause) what's the deal, governor snyder? >> i sid this wasn't on my agenda for some time but if you look at it, we're losing a major competitive advantage. indiana has become a right-to-work state and i've looked at their pipeline. they have significantly increased the number of businesses looking to come to indiana and grow in indiana due to this legislation. >> jon: indiana! those sweet-faced good natured job-stealing sons of bitches. (laughter) wait a minute, let's go with the right spacing for that. india, north america! well, don't think we won't detect your call center accents, india n.a. how are michigan's union members takintaking this news? >> prounion protesters are swarming the capital building in lancing. >> hey, hey, ho, ho, right to work has got to go. >> union busting is disgusting! (laughter). >> jon: dude, you're from michigan, detroit, "8 mile." you've got to come up with better rhymes that busting-disgusting if you want to win the khraoe climactic rap. you have to put effort into it. (laughter) (cheers and applause) look, you have one job at one factory, when you seize every benefit you could, yo, our palms are sweaty, knees week, arms heavy, working in a factory all day building chevys, like the volt, you plug it in, and then you win -- ecologically, because if it was an actual race you would not -- actually. you've got to dues collect for the unions oro bahts are going to come and take away our jobs or to the chinese kids with the tiny hands to work and go -- ♪ this of ha tunety comes once in a lifetime note? note yo! (cheers and applause) you know what i realized? if i perform my hoff-torah a as bad as that i would owe my relatives money. for more we go to aasif mandvi in michigan and jason jones in indiana. there's not much kpet advantage in doing something that almost half the other states have already done. >> hey, jon, michigan doesn't have to beat half the country, we just have to be better than indiana. >> good luck with that. michigan's not a state! it's more of a dingle berry hanging off canada's -- (laughter). >> indiana's a great place to send jobs! it's got the weather of north dakota and the racial harmony of mississippi! (laughter) >> indiana didn't take michigan's jobs, all right? michael moore ate them! (laughter) >> jon: now that both indiana and michigan have the exact same right to work laws, though, how are you going to differentiate yourselves? >> right to work? jon, come on, that is so 11 months ago. indiana's latest pro-business measure is the workplace safety act. any business that relocates here gets to dump whatever they want wherever they want for free. lakes, rivers, wetlands. they take all factories toxic slurry. >> jon: you call that workplace safety act. >> studies show poisoning the environments cuts workplace beaver bites down to zero. no more raccoon maulings or slipping on the o *d toad on a factory floor. dow chemical is very interesting. >> that's no match for michigan's latest pro-business measure. work force education. >> jon: yeah, i'm going to guess that's not really educating workers, is it? >> it's the opposite! if your business needs cheap workers to pull long hours, michigan will turn its schools into factories! no more recess, kids, now it's a five-minute smoke break then back to the metal-stamp magazine! newspaper. >> nice try. but indiana has the pension acceleration act. >> jon: for god's sake what are you euthanizing workers when they hit retirement age? >> come on! isn't that brilliant? >> yeah, well we will build you a pit where you can throw your payroll and watch workers fight over it for your amusement armed only with the bones of the fortunate dead. >> jon: oh, for god's sake, what is that called? >> that is the incentive-based compensation bill. governor snyder says he's ready to sign it. >> jon: . >> son of a bitch! >> who's the dingleberry now, jones, huh? >> jon: guys! these measures are creative but they don't create jobs. you're just trying to poach jobs from neighboring states by selling out your own workers. it's a race to the bottom. >> but whoever gets to the bottom first wins, right? (laughter). >> jon: i guess that's right. >> then it's on! >> yeah, (bleep)! come on! >> jon: aasif (cheers and applause). >> jon: thank you. these ties are very in. (laughter) wink! welcome back to the show. let's turn our focus to europe. remember this fella here over my shoulder there? silvio berlusconi. a billionaire prime minister of italy elected three times even though as they say in rome, he was corrupt. >> the italian prime minister is no stranger to scandal. charges of bribery, corruption and embezzlement. >> officially guilty of tax fraud. >> sentenced to newshour years in prison for tax fraud. >> a serial flanderer. >> tales of lavish orgies. >> notorious all night so-called bunga-bunga parties. paying for sex with an underage prostitute. >> he was saying he could haven't sex with 11 women so instead he had sex with eight women. (laughter). >> jon: a man who had sex with eight women. that's the worst bond villain ever! (laughter) and if you pull one of them off, you just grow back. last november with the italian economy tanking, voters replaced berlusconi with his polar opposite, mario monti, an academic economist who promised to balance italy's books with strict austerity measures. that's not an easy choice. the country basically deciding it would be better to live with its hard-ass stepfather even though its real father was outside revving up his alfa romeo promising to take everyone to a strip club for prosecco and waffles. (laughter) or whatever better version of waffles they have in italy. i'm sure. really? his zells is that what they do? (laughter) look at that grill pattern. it's (bleep)ing beautiful. how do they do it? everything you eat is better there. kosher hot dogs. they probably have some kind of thing that gets saysly and blub blub. anyway, italy sucked it up and got the fiscal house in better shape, everyone's glad they did what they did. almost everyone. >> one of italy's most controversial former leaders is eyeing a comeback. berlusconi says he's planning to run again. this would be his fourth term in office. >> jon: he was convicted -- (laughter). he was convicted of tax fraud six weeks ago. he was sentenced to newshour years. now i understand he's appealing the sentence and that with time off for at least good behavior he could be out in let's say two years. who is going to take this seriously? >> monti announcing he'll step down before his term ends. the decision comes after the party of former prime minister silvio berlusconi withdrew its support for monti's government last week. >> jon: holy (bleep). (laughter) how does this guy do that? italy, what are you doing? berlusconi doesn't even want this. >> speaking to reporters at a football match he sounded almost reluctant. "i'm returning sadly to public service." (laughter) "again, i'm doing it out of a sense of responsibility." (laughter) stphaoud if you had a sense of responsibility you would have stopped at the seventh girl! you went eight! when has berlusconi ever displayed a sense of responsibility? his family crest is a guy (bleep)ing in a swimming pool! (laughter). (cheers and applause) congratulations to the graphics team on that one. (laughter) they've outdone themselves. maybe you don't want monti, fine. but does that mean berlusconi has to take over? don't off football star? that guy could be it. roberto be benigni, he's so fun. mario! such a good driver! il divo, there's four of them! they could split it up, for god's sakes. this guy is unbelievable. he has taken what normally would be enough oil yee gotism to get him to run for office maybe once and turned that into enough oil yee gotism for four separate campaigns. what's the opposite of a chanukah miracle? that's what he's done. how does he win? he's got a it will something up his sleeve. >> former italian prime minister silvio berlusconi, the gift that keeps on giving released an album of love songs today. (audience reacts) >> jon: go on! ♪ ♪ >> jon: okay, that's freaky, but that's not even the freakiest music video i've seen this week. ♪ i'm coming home, i got a little plan for you ♪ that i just might do ♪ let's do a little dance for two -- ♪ >> jon: that's number one, baby! %77i8#gzipipam6=[(m",xui'# (cheers and applause). >> jon: welcome back! my guest tonight is a fine one, stars in show time's "the big c." her new film is called "hyde park on the hudson." >> is my wife behaving herself? >> yes. >> has my mother calmed down? >> she's fine. >> it's like a mad house. >> don't worry. all's quiet on the upstairs front. you look younger than i'd imagined. for a king, you know? >> he s he? >> they both seem nervous. that surprised me. >> without some help from us, daisy, there might not be an england to be king of. >> jon: f.d.r.'s getting hammered. (laughter) please welcome back to the program laura linney. (cheers and applause) nice to see you. thank you for coming back. >> thank you for inviting me. >> please, you know, i love these historical films often times they are fantasy and fiction. this is based on this woman's diary. >> part of it, yes. absolutely. absolutely. the movie takes place over one weekend and there is a sort of a poetic license given with time and dates and things like that. however the woman who i play is someone who i had never heard of before, most people don't know that she even existed. and it was daisy suckley and she was f.d.r.'s cousin and very, very close confidante. >> jon: yes. >> yes! yes! >> jon: and in the day confidante, obviously -- >> (laughs) well, what happened was this woman lived to be 100 years old and she always sort of -- she was a real wall flower. no one took her seriously. she always feigned ignorance to anything about the president. that she was just a cousin and helped keep him company and then when she died at 100 under her bed was a little -l -l suitcase filled with letters. filled. letters and diaries that their relationship was much more extensive than anyone understood and was non-platonic. >> jon: did you have an opportunity to look at these? >> i saw the suitcase! (laughs) >> >> jon: did chef a sam son night? >> her home is this amazing museum that most people also don't know about which is very close to hyde park you can go there and learn about daisy and her family. it's a magnificent place to go. the letters are at the presidential library at hyde park. >> jon: does she have surviving family members like children? >> no, no, she was single. (laughter). >> jon: what an amazing -->> amazing. but she woke up -- the people were kind enough to let me into her bedroom which is still exactly the way it was when she died and she lived in a -- she slept in a single bed and woke up every morning and the first thing she saw was a huge lithograph of f.d.r. next to that was a place filled with knickknacks, stuff he would get up -- >> jon: what's a it have stphraoepb. >> like a glass cabinet. with shelves. >> jon: knickknacks he broughter? >> that's right. >> jon: but things like he's in an airport like "oh, i better glagrab a shot glass." >> exactly. little thing she is placed in a shrine. and when i found out she's the one who gave him the dog which he was so associated with. and i never -- when i found -- that was the one bit of information that -- i don't know why it shocked me so much but i just assumed it was a family dog. >> jon: there's an intimacy to giving someone a dog, i think, that surpasses even that type of illicit affair. >> yeah. >> jon: i'm amazing that eleanor, being the woman that she was, she would allow all that other stuff. i would think she would draw the line -- >> with the dog. (laughter). >> jon: i know that sound strange but i can see that that would be a deal breaker. >> i think at that point f.d.r. was known to have many friendships with many women and there was a -- >> jon: there's museums all over. (laughter) >> it's true. >> jon: there's a bunch of lithographs of f.d.r. all over. >> he would sign them. >> jon: exactly. >> there was a constellation of women around him and they each had very different personalities and they each -- how sexual some of these relationships were is up for negotiations so to speak. >> jon: i'm sure it was. (laughter) i'm sure that's what they talked about at yalta. listen, did eleanor -- you know, -- there's so much to get into that we don't even have time about the king coming there to visit them this is 1939, we had not entered the war. this was their idea to get us involved. was it successful? >> profoundly successful and a period of time when it's hard for me to even realize it that the u.s. didn't like britain very much at all. >> we're nervous about getting entangled. >> jon: and no royal had ever stepped foot in the united states before. so they came for a weekend to try to get support from f.d.r. to go and join them the war effort and f.d.r. very shrewdly threw a picnic and had the king eat a hot dog. (laughter) and it was that moment that changed the relationship between the count two countries. it's crazy. >> jon: explosive diarrhea will do that. (laughter) i'm telling you, you have to go see it. bill murray's great, you're great, everybody. it's terrific. it's called "hyde park on the hudson." you have to see it. laura linney, everybody. (cheers and applause)
PBS
Dec 5, 2012 6:30pm PST
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening, everyone. i'm susie gharib. citigroup announces major layoffs, cutting 11,000 jobs. is this a sign of things to come in corporate america? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. president obama tries to win over top business leaders, warning republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not unique to citi; it's industry- wide. a financial industry runs into huge problems. it happened in the '30s, and it happened in the last five years. when you go through these periods, you go through a lot of change. that industry is now trying to figure out what is the right size of the industry. >> reporter: still, economists say citi's action today is not the start of a new wave of mass layoffs across corporate america. the nation's job market may not be robust, but it's not frozen, either. in fact, today, the payroll firm a.d.p. reported 118,000 new private sector jobs were added in november, fewer than in october. the blame for last month's slowdown in hiring falls squarely on hurricane sandy, not on any new or widespread weakness in the economy. >> i would expect that by december, we're going to see some bounce back. much of the disruption from sandy was people simply not being able to get to work or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller takes a closer look at how technology is helping to boost safety and productivity. >> reporter: three years ago, this long island hospital had a problem: healthcare workers weren't cleaning their hands as often as required. >> 100,000 people die each year in the united states from hospital acquired infections. that's more than the number of people who die from breast cancer and from auto accidents. it's a huge problem, one that we want to make a dent in. >> reporter: lowering the number of infections is also good for the hospital's financial health. >> it increases length of stay. it doubles the cost of many operations. we're not reimbursed the same way that we used to for hospital-acquired infections. >> reporter: so the hospital tried an experiment. it put cameras at the entrance to patient rooms in its intensive care unit and tallied how many times workers followed hand hygiene procedures. the compliance rate was less than 10%. but once the hospital started posting the results for the shift publicly, the rate skyrocketed to over 90%. and there were other benefits: >> the patient's family-- as soon as they see us coming in and out, and when they see the hand... the activity of the hand hygiene in and out-- they themselves are using the same methodology. >> reporter: but even if you don't work in healthcare, remote video auditing may be coming to your workplace. the company that makes the monitoring system predicts that virtually every industry will be using this technology within the next decade. >> we are now working in europe and starting to get going in the middle east and asia. so there's absolutely no bounds to what this can do. >> reporter: arrowsight's technology is also widely used by the meat industry; in some cases, boosting productivity by more than 10%. the biggest barrier to adoption of the technology is not employee backlash, it's money. >> the most difficult thing about a new technology or new service is getting companies that didn't have this anywhere in their budget to create a budget line for it. >> reporter: but north shore hospital says its investment has more than paid off. >> it probably costs at least $40,000 to treat every serious m.r.s.a. infection. if we can eliminate just a handful of those in a year, we've easily paid for it. >> reporter: already, the hospital is planning to expand its video monitoring to other departments, including improving operating room safety and efficiency. erika miller, "n.b.r.," manhasset, new york. >> bob baur is the chief global economist at principle global investors, with $275 billion on management. bob, the higher productive numbers, will that lead to more hiring, regardless of what happens with the fiscal cliff? >> i think it will. we have said for some time that businesses have pushed productivity as far as they can. if we continue at a modest, 2.5% growth rate, that will be enough that businesses will be forced to higher at a faster pace. >> tom: but we're not hearing a lot of confidence coming from the business community. we're seeing it in housing and automotive sales, but in terms of hiring, it is languishing. why do you think that difference exists? >> i think business is looking ahead. there is a real dichotomy, as you mentioned, between businesses and costumers. businesses are looking ahead, and they're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already taking action today to try to prepare for that eventuality. but the consumer is kind of blankly ignoring this, and confidence is up for really lots of reasons. i mean, the net worth of households has been repaired. about two-thirds of it has come back as house prices rise and stock prices are now double what they were at the bottom in march of '09. when you look at state and local budgets, they're now much better with revenue rising. so the layoffs and budget cuts, we think are waning, if not over. housing is clearly coming back. things are improving and consumer confidence reflects that. >> tom: but there is that dark cloud of the fiscal cliff. you mentioned it earlier, businesses planning for consumer confidence to go off that cliff if we go off it as a country. do you not agree with that prospect? >> well, no. i believe it will -- if nothing happens and there is no agreement, i think there will be a mild, kind of technical recession in the first half of next year. maybe a 1% decline contraction for both the first and second quarter. but i don't think it will do very much fundamental damage underneath that. it will kind of reduce the base from which spending grows, but once that base is down slightly, i think the growth will continue. >> tom: real quick, is it going to continue for housing and autos, do you think? >> yes. those are the two key things that in the past have really driven recoveries. they haven't for the last three years because housing was part of the crisis, and consumers didn't want to borrow to buy cars. but now i think that is coming back. and that is going to drive the recovery, more like what we're used to. >> tom: a little bit of a tail wind. bob baur along with us, he is with principle global investors. >> susie: still ahead: freeport mcmoran copper and gold will soon be mining more than its namesake metals. we'll explain. more tough talk today from washington on the fiscal cliff: treasury secretary timothy geithner said he's willing to go over it if republicans don't agree to tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. president obama said basically the same thing but added one more hard line to the negotiations. >> if congress in any way suggests that they're going to tie negotiations to a debt ceiling vote and take us to the brink of default once again, as part of a budget negotiation-- which, by the way, we have never done in our history until we did it last year-- i will not play that game. >> late today the president spoke by telephone with house speaker john boehner. no specifics on what they said to each other, but it was their first conversation in a week. eventually the two sides will get down to bargaining over specifics, including entitlements. one idea may be to change the way the government measures inflation. that may sound like a small change, but, as darren gersh reports, it could have a big impact. >> reporter: if the price of oranges goes up, consumers will buy apples and other cheaper foods. we know that. economists call that switching "substitution," but that change in behavior doesn't show up in the official inflation rate. so most economists think the current consumer price index overstates the actual cost of living. that's important because the inflation rate is used to set tax brackets and social security benefits. moving to a more accurate inflation measure called the "chained c.p.i." would cut the deficit by $200 billion over ten years. supporters say the change wouldn't cut benefits. >> if we're making the change to reflect what is the real cost of living, as opposed to a different one, then you are not reducing them; you're just truing up what you should be getting. not something that-- i hate to use the term-- that might be inflated beyond what it should have been. >> reporter: this so-called technical fix will shave a quarter of a percentage point off social security's annual cost of living increase, and that difference adds up over time. some worry that will hurt the very old. >> it cuts real benefits. if somebody is getting fewer dollars in their check, that's real to them. and for people who are sliding progressively farther behind prevailing living standards, which is true of those out of the labor force for a very long time, it's about as real as it gets. >> reporter: but the change to a chained c.p.i. is easy to do, and that means it could be packaged into a deficit agreement quickly if there is bipartisan agreement to act. darren gersh, "n.b.r.," washington. . down tnvbz%. d right? q: slgtç7 >> susie: you're pretty upbeat on the stock market side. taking look at the forecast for the s&p 500, you're calling for a gain of 8%, it will get to the 1575 level to the 1400 level. what is going to give investors confidence to take their money out of cash and invest it in stocks? >> again, susie, we've had some significant head winds over the past year or so. we think as we get past the fiscal cliff and job creation continues, i think investors are going to be feeling a little more optmistic. we think with modest earnings growth, we're looking for earnings to be up about 5%, and with a little extra improvement and sentiment, investors could push the market up about 8%. not a big gain, but a decent one, giving the slow-growing economy we're seeing right now. >> susie: your whole forecast is depending on an agreement on fiscal cliff. if we go over the cliff, what happens to your forecast. what will you be saying at the start of the year about the outlook for the economy and jobs. >> a lot of people are focused on the january 1st deadline. we don't think if we don't have an agreement by january 1st that everything falls apart. what we're watching very closely is if there is still negotiating taking place. if we still see both sides talk, i don't think the january 1st deadline is going to mean that much. we would only worry about the worst-case scenario with the economy contracting if there is a real stalemate and both parties walk away from the talks. we don't expect that. we're beginning to see some signs there is some willingness to compromise on both parties. >> susie: as we said from the start, you're pretty positive on the outlook. gary thayer of wells fargo advisor. >> susie: los angeles and long beach port workers were back at work today, ending a costly eight-day strike. the ports were crippled after clerical workers went on strike and were supported by the longshoreman's union, which refused to cross the picket line. the shutdown cost $1 billion a day. the work stoppage also forced ships to reroute to ports in mexico, panama and northern california. a tentative deal was reached late last night after federal mediators joined negotiations. no details yet on the deal, but workers are expected to get new terms that will prevent jobs from being outsourced. >> tom: we saw the influence of apple on any stock index which includes it. without apple, the dow rallied. but the nasdaq and s&p 500 were weighed down thanks to apple's weakness. the s&p 500 hit its lowest level of the session just after a stronger than expected report on the services sector before 11:00 a.m. eastern time. it bounced into positive territory and closed up 0.2%. volume picked up a little on the big board with 757 million shares. 1.8 billion moved on the nasdaq. the technology sector was the big drag on the broad market. it fell 1.3%. the utility sector saw the best gains, up 1.6%. apple put the brakes on the broad market, selling off on heavier than usual volume. apple fell 6.4%, with the stock closing at a three-week low. there are plenty of trader theories behind the weakness in apple. they include apple not announcing a special shareholder dividend; reports of traders facing higher margins if they borrowed money to buy apple stock, leading them to cut their positions; and worries about new competition from nokia. speaking of competition for the iphone, nokia announced a deal with china-mobile to sell its top lumia smartphone in china. shares of nokia jumped 12.8%. volume was very heavy as shares sit at a seven-month high. meantime, banking stocks were in focus thanks to the job cuts announced at citigroup. bank of america joined in the rally with shares closing with a double-digit handle. with b. of a. finishing the session at $10.46, it's the first close over $10 per share since july 2011. also helping the financial sector: insurance companies. two of them released their estimates of how much hurricane sandy will cost them. travelers figures the storm will cost it $650 million. hartford pegged its storm losses as high as $350 million. analysts say the companies can absorb the impact. both stocks were higher. travelers rallied 4.9%, closing less than one dollar away from a new 52-week high. hartford added 2.9%. drug giant pfizer had encouraging news on an experimental breast cancer drug. with up to $6 billion in potential global sales, the stock rallied. shares jumped 1.9% on heavier than usual volume. while the breast cancer drug tests were positive, any regulatory approval wouldn't happen for at least a couple of years. three of the five most actively traded exchange traded products were up. the financial e.t.f. had the best gains, up 1.2%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: a tough day for investors in freeport mcmoran. the stock plunged 16% on news that the mining company is buying two oil and gas producers. it's paying $9 billion for plains exploration and production company and mcmoran exploration company. diane eastabrook has details on freeport's plans to build a larger, more diversified company. >> reporter: freeport mcmoran tried to assure investors today that getting into the energy business doesn't mean the company is turning its back on mining. under the deal, freeport will pay $6.9 billion for plains exploration and production and $2.1 billion for mcmoran exploration, a sister company it was separated from a couple of decades ago. the deal would also leave freeport with $20 billion of debt. freeport executives say getting into oil and natural gas would help diversify the company and keep more of its assets in north america, where there's a huge shale gas boom. they estimate by next year freeport will derive a little more than a quarter of its profits from energy and the rest from mining, versus 100% from mining today. the company says it thinks demand for commodities, especially energy, will continue to grow. that could help offset the increased difficulty mining companies are having trying to find new projects in regions outside the u.s. and with interest rates currently at historic lows, the timing was right to ink the two deals. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> tom: daniel rohr is a metals and mining analyst from morningstar and joins us from chicago. dan, how unique of a deal is this in the u.s. to have mining and energy drilling all in the same company? >> it is very unusual, forthe p. decades, ago, however, we had seen a lot of the oil majors, folks like amco, with exposure to mining as well. this is an animal we haven't seen in quite sometime in the u.s. >> tom: what drove the deal for freport, why did it want to go outside its expertise mining, that was two generations of leaders ago. why now? >> yeah. i'm still struggling with the underlying strategic rationale for this deal. judging by the stock market, i can't see a clear rationale as far as why they did this. what management has said is they see a compelling story for oil and gas demand over the next several decades, and the purchase of plains and m.n.r., was a good way to bet on that outlook. >> tom: i suppose one point that is worth exploring here is little bit, mac moran and mines around the world, they're mostly based here in the u.s. is that a big change, and why that? >> freport's mining assets consistent of as you said, copper and gold in indonesia, and they've got composure to the democratic public of congo, and they have some mining assets in the united states and south america as well. but what the u.s. oil and natural gas assets bring to the table, in addition to commodities, is well outside freport's existing portfolio of business, is a reduced level of country risk, especially compared to what you undertake when you do business in indonesia or the d.r.c. >> tom: just a half minute left, and i want to ask you about the stock for freport mac moran, how should long-term investors take a look at this? >> well, long-term investors that had been sitting in freport original need to ask themselves are you really interested in this oil and gas story. because you need to remember investors to have undertaken this deal on their own. they didn't need freporto go out and lever up and pay a 39% premium for planes. >> tom: dan, do you own freport? >> i do not. >> tom: daniel rohr with us, he is with morningstar. >> reporter: i'm erika miller in new york. tomorrow, we'll talk to the c.e.o. of kitchen chain sur la table and hear his outlook for holiday spending. >> susie: finally, we want to remind you about a special guest on "n.b.r." tomorrow: "n.b.r." founding co-anchor paul kangas will join us tomorrow night, december 6. and we'll talk about the markets, and he'll answer some of your questions. that's tomorrow night. and you can submit your questions on facebook or twitter at bizrpt. i'll be in miami with both of you. >> tom: we've been straightening up the studio for your visit here, susie. we've been sweeping up and cleaning up. >> susie: i was counting on that. thanks, tom. >> tom: you've got it. >> susie: that's "nightly business report" for wednesday, december 5. have a great evening, everyone. and you, too, tom. >> tom: good night, susie. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> join us anytime at nbr.com. there, you'll find full episodes of the program, complete show transcripts and all the market stats. also follows us on our facebook page at bizrpt. and on twitter @bizrpt.
ABC
Dec 10, 2012 11:35pm PST
presents you bion line to your front door on time and unharmed. >>> a young veteran with hollywood dreams goes to meet a new mentor and gets the surprise of his life. >> whoa! >> hollywood legend tom hanks is standing up for heroes. >> from the global resources of abc stnews, this is "nightline, december 10th, 2012. >>> good evening, i'm bill weir. in the annals of radio pranks this was hardly among the most mean-spirited. in a mischievous attempt to phone dutch chis kate took a very dark turn after a nurse who seemed to fall for the prank was found dead, two shock jocks behind the hoax received threats, lost their show, and after days in hiding are now speaking out. here's abc's cecilia vega. >> rang king henry vii hospital to try to get in touch with the duchess. . >> can you believe what's happened today? >> and they were put through to kate's ward. >> in just a few days this australian duo have gone from celebrating their infamous pranks to sobbing about it. >> they were the worst accents ever. >> reporter: to sobbing about it. >> personally i'm -- >> last night d.j.s mel greig and michael christian came out of hiding on australia's channel 9 tv, offering a tearful apology. >> the entertainment value wasn't us, it was meant to be in our silly accents, that's where it was meant to end. >> reporter: but it didn't end there. instead it ended in tragedy with the apparent suicide of a nurse who became the butt of a royal hoax heard around the world. these shock jocks were themselves shocked. >> shattered, gutted, heartbroken and obviously, you know, our deepest sympathies are with the family and friends. >> not a minute goes by that we don't think about the family and what they must be going through and the thought we may have played a part in that is -- g gut-wrenching. >> who's to think. we've been handed a phone number, all right? we have been told that this phone number is the hospital where kate middleton is currently staying. >> reporter: just last week, it was all laughs for michael and mel when they called up the london hospital where kate middleton was recovering from severe morning sickness. pretending to be queen lit beth and prince charles. >> hello there, may i please speak to kate please, my granddaughter? >> hold on, ma'am. >> reporter: they said they never imagined they'd get through. >> good morning, how may i help you? >> i'm after my granddaughter, kate, i want to see how her tummy bug is going. >> she's sleeping at the moment, she's had an uneventful night. >> 100 people before us would have tried it. the accents were terrible not for a second did we expect to speak to kate let alone have a conversation with anyone at the hospital. we wanted to be hung up on. >> reporter: but that didn't happen. the call was patched through to kate's private nurse where some of the duchess' personal health information was given out for the world to hear. >> she has been getting fluids to rehydrate her because she was quite dehydrated when she came in. she's stable at the moment. >> okay, i'll just feed my little corgies, then. >> reporter: the duo could have never predicted the tragedy that followed. days later, jacintha saldana, the nurse who first picked up, would be found dead. >> we found out about the same time and i think it was -- >> the worst phone call i ever had in my life. >> reporter: but things could get even worse for the deejays. they've been yanked off the airwaves. the radio station canceled their show. all the biting headlines continue and they may have to face questioning from the australian police. here in the streets of sydney, there's still support for the team. >> she didn't sound like the queen. >> no, not at all. >> i think it was an amazing prank that has gone tranlcally wrong. >> reporter: but the global backlash has been fierce from online death threats to calls for prison. >> the question becomes as a legal matter what possible crimes were committed by the prank itself? i think it's going to be nearly impossible to legally connect the prank to the death. when it comes to criminal charges. >> reporter: the station announced it is suspending phony phone calls and advertising indefinitely. >> the real punishment here for the deejays and the stations can come from the public and from advertisers. that's going to be the way that they can really suffer. >> reporter: as for the popular deejays, they may be silenced and out of a radio job. but they have one final thing to say to a grieving family. >> we thought about this a million times in my head that i wanted to reach out to them and give them a big hug and say sorry. i hope they're okay. i really do. >> reporter: for "nightline," i'm cecilia vega in sydney, australia. >>> coming up next, we follow that present behind the scenes with the people racing to get all the holiday cheer you bought online under your tree in the nick of time. ♪ [ male announcer ] with free package pickup from the u.s. postal service the holidays are easy. visit usps.com. pay, print, and have it picked up for free before december 20h for delivery in time for the holidays. you can even give us special instructions on where to find it. free package pickup. from the u.s. postal service. because it's nice to have an extra pair of hands around for the holidays. [ male announcer ] you've reached the age where you don't back down from a challenge. this is the age of knowing how to make things happen. so, why let erectile dysfunction get in your way? talk to your doctor about viagra. 20 million men already have. ask your doctor if your heart is healthy enough for sex. do not take viagra if you take nitrates for chest pain; it may cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. side effects include headache, flushing, upset stomach, and abnormal vision. to avoid long-term injury, seek immediate medical help for an erection lasting more than four hours. stop taking viagra and call your doctor right away if you experience a sudden decrease or loss in vision or hearing. this is the age of taking action. viagra. talk to your doctor. he loves risk. but whether he's climbing everest, scuba diving the great barrier reef with sharks, or jumping into the market, he goes with people he trusts, which is why he trades with a company that doesn't nickel and dime him with hidden fees. so he can worry about other things, like what the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> "nightline" continues from new york city with bill weir. >> christmas may be a couple of weeks away. for those in charge of making sure your twirinkets and treasus make it in time, the season is happening right now. millions upon millions of packages are winging their way across the country as i speak. one of the busiest shipping nights of all time. john donvan brings us a look at the people hard at work trying to outdo the big man up north. >> reporter: the story of a pie in a box at christmas time and the many people who help get it from point "a" -- >> off to honolulu. >> reporter: to point "b." >> i hope it's something good. >> which is the story of fedex which like u.p.s. and the u.s. postal service is how christmas gets handled these days. >> a hand crafted metal book end. >> reporter: the busiest day of the year for fedex, shipping an estimated 19 million packages. thanks to the start of the busiest time of year for online shopping. thanks to procrastinators, there are 14 shopping days left which translates into how many shipping days? that depends what you're sending and how much you're willing to spend. the u.s. postal service can be cheaper but down to the wire, fedex and u.p.s. can save the day with last minute deliveries which brings us to our pie which i picked up in a historic little town in virginia from a friendly little place called -- you see the sign. hi, john. >> avis, how are you? >> reporter: meet mom, avis renshaw. as avis showed me what was on offer, i explained i had it in mind to send the pie to my friend and colleague yunji de nies. one-time abc news reporter, now happily anchoring the news at kitv in honolulu, hawaii. distance involved in roughly 6,000 miles. my deadly for getting the pie to her? 24 hours. you send pies to hawaii? and they get there in one piece? >> amazingly, yes, they do. >> reporter: for precious and fragile items? best to leave the packaging to the professionals. >> have a great day. >> reporter: and the pie is out the door. first human link in the fedex chain. the first of many. >> i place the pie securely in one designated area in the truck. >> reporter: for the next few hours, you see that purple line? that's our pie on its journey headed for memphis, tennessee. why memphis? well, look at this place. it is fedex's global superhub which at more than 800 acres feels more like a military base than a shipping facility. and with christmas approaching it's a military base gearing up for battle. >> it's what we prepare for. it's our super bowl. >> reporter: this is your super bowl? >> this is our super bowl. >> reporter: marcus martinez keeps the planes running on time. and the vans and the trucks and 42 miles of conveyor belts. every package is sent to a hub leerk like this before going on its journey. >> how big of a surge? >> from 1.5 million a night to between 1.9 and 2.1 million a night. >> push back approved 1-8 right. >> reporter: let's check in on our pie, which they were kind enough to track just for us. it's coming in for a landing soon. out to the tarmac nonstop on the runways. okay, so these are now all incoming still. >> exactly. we're going to bring in 15 jet aircraft tonight. >> reporter: tonight alone? >> tonight alone. >> reporter: how busy does this place get compared to other airports? >> after dark it's the busiest airport in the world. >> reporter: most of the work here happens after midnight. timing is everything. back in the command center an on screens all over a clock is counting down the deadline for getting all the packages in and out again. and then our pie is now safely on the ground. thanks to these two members of the "nightline" pie delivery team. >> thanks to the fine landing by the first officer the pie is in one piece. >> reporter: normally the pie would be in one of these shipping containers. >> where's our pie? >> we have your pyrite here. >> reporter: for now it's being carried so we can track it through our next stop. they call this the matrix. >> if you stand here for 15 minutes you will see the world's economy pass before your eyes. >> reporter: it's a building functioning as a sorting machine. the incoming packages slide in here. >> you'll see major tech shipments, you will see medical shipments. >> reporter: and a pie? >> and a pie. >> reporter: into the matrix goes our box the pie inside. courtesy of lawrence wicks. >> the packages never stop coming. i've got to get back to sorting, okay? >> reporter: and the box once it drops out of sight into a hidden place of chutes and conveyer belts and scanners it is steered by belts to another building. ten minutes later, it comes down a chute and gets picked up and put into a container. >> off to honolulu. >> reporter: and then it's out to the runway and takeoff. and six hours later, landing in hawaii. our last driver to deliver -- >> i hope this is something good. oh! >> reporter: happy holidays, yunji. >> thanks, john. >> reporter: don't just thank me. avis and diane and bill and marcus and lawrence and bill and greg and darrell all had a hand in getting you that pie. i'm john donvan for "nightline." >> how do i get on your gift list, john? thanks for that. >>> coming up a veteran returning home from battle with big hollywood dreams gets a very unexpected mentor. i have what science calls the nightly stuffy nose thing. i can't breathe, so i can't sleep. and the next day i pay for it. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. [ female announcer ] exercise your right to breathe right. get two free strips at breatheright.com. hey it's your right to breathe right. >>> more than 200,000 troops are expected to retire from the military this year and when they come home they face another kind of battle, breaking into a new career. many are looking for a helping hand. when one soldier with hollywood aspirations went looking for a mentor he never dreamed who would answer. here's abc's bob woodruff. >> reporter: gabriel posey is about to get the biggest surprise of his life. he is a 32-year-old staff sergeant in the army just back from 11 months in afghanistan. now along with 200,000 veterans leaving the military this year alone he is looking for a new career. gabriel applied for a mentor through a group called american corporate partners, acp. what he doesn't know yet is his mentor is one of the biggest names in hollywood. what would be your dream now that you are going into this world in the u.s. you've been away from the last nine years since you've been serving? >> my dream is to write for television or film. >> have you done that before? >> no. >> have you done film or television work? >> i have no formal training. >> this is purely a dream? >> yes. >> reporter: who better to help him reach that dream job than tom hanks. >> i've got to find bubba! >> reporter: some of his best known roles are from films about war. "forrest gump" and "saving private ryan." hanks is a long-standing advocate of veterans affairs. >> when you were a kid did you think about the military? >> yes. because i lived in alameda, california, during the vietnam war. alameda where the naval air station is. i'm going to say 98% of my friends had their fathers serving overseas. so the military was a fabric of life. >> reporter: to control his expectations, i tell gabriel that his mentor is not really a well-known person in the industry. i lied. i'm going to show you who this is. i think you'll be happy. >> oh! wow! no way. i love tom hanks. >> all right. so we're going to take you down there to meet him for the first time. >> reporter: on our drive over gabriel gets his thoughts and questions together before his big meeting with a hollywood legend. >> what would be the number one thing you would tell to gabriel about getting into the film industry? >> you have to say i know who i am and know what my skills are and i'm in this for the long haul. perseverance. it all comes down to that. gabriel, how are you? what a pleasure. nice to see you. you've got to call me tom. >> reporter: to begin their meeting, tom hanks serves gabriel from teapots straight off the sets of "devin vee choed" and "charlie wilson's war." >> when you first started did you envision yourself where you are now? >> i didn't envision this. i just wanted to have the fun of filming. >> have you ever tasted failure while working? how did you deal with it? >> oh, yeah. you as a writer are going to write things that no one is going to get, no one is going to understand. you can't get that get in your way. i have made films that haven't done any business. without a doubt. but that doesn't mean i haven't learned something from doing that and that doesn't mean that individual project is not going to have a life long after what i've done. >> reporter: gabriel is one of 1600 mentees in the program. is this the type of stuff you're looking to do? >> reporter: mentorship is not about giving him a job. it is really just to give him some guidance. >> meeting him was daunting but it inspired me and energized me for what lies ahead. >> reporter: gabriel says he will move in february from his home in philadelphia to the sunshine of l.a. a brand new dream and a long way from afghanistan. for "nightline" i'm bob woodruff in los angeles. >> you can see more of standing up for heroes in our five-part series with tom hanks and abcnews.com/heroes. >>> millions with roots in the southern side of north america are in mourning tonight after singer jenny rivera was killed in a plane crash last night. she is known as the diva of the banda. the california native exploded onto mexico's music scene as a single mom in her 30s, became a star and was poised to break into the american market with a comedy series on abc. jenny rivera was 43. >>> up next on "jimmy kimmel live." >> my favorite thing about hanukkah is there's no wrong way to spell it. i think chewbacca is acceptable. >> ted danson. >> how nice. you wore your men's club tie. >> yeah. >> oh! >> and emilia clarke. >> you got punched by a hooker? >> yes. >> what did she say? >> introducing reindeer in the mirror.
SFGTV2
Dec 31, 2012 10:30am PST
♪if you are wondering, you will be glad to know... ends are so small. that it is me that you adore ♪from now till forever more. ♪that's all, baby ♪that's all. ♪ that's all. ♪ [ applause ] ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas ♪ >> make the yule tide bright. from now on, our troubles will be out, out of sight. have yourself a merry little christmas ♪ make the yuletide gay. ♪from now on, our troubles will be miles away, miles away. ♪ ♪ ♪we are in older day, happy golden days of yore ♪ ♪faithful friends who are dear to us will be kneer to us once more ♪through the years, we all will be together. >> hang a shining star on top of the highest bow. ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas now. ♪ ♪ ♪have yourself a merry little christmas. let your hearts be light ♪ ♪from now on, our troubles will be out, out of sight ♪ ♪have yourself, a merry little christmas. make the yule tide gay. from now on our troubles will be miles, miles away. ♪here we are as in olden days, happy golden days of yore. happy friends who are dear to us gather near to us once more. ♪ >> through the years, we all will be together ♪if the fates allow. ♪until then we will have to muddle through somehow. and have yourself... a merry little christmas now. ♪ >> thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you. >> i am in the holiday spirit now, aren't you? let's hear it for tammy hall and veronica klaus. >> i got jealous for a minute there, some of the members of the san francisco boys chorus are getting more pictures than i am. as you look around this room, think about the events that you have been to in the city hall in this one rotunda or one of the offices and so many wonderful weddings and so many celebrations and so many heart rending speeches and yes, some sad occasions too. all a part of our community and our beautiful city. as you look around this room tonight, what a diverse combination we have. it makes me smile, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just have to go slowly, they told me, it is my pleasure to introduce the executive director of the rainbow world fund. this organization creates this holiday tree now, this is the 7th year. let's hear for that, 7 years of anything is a long time [ applause ] rainbow world fund was founded 12 years ago, the concept and wanted to think locally but he wanted to act globally. and indeed, he has figured out a way to strengthen the lgbt community by reaching out to the world on their behalf. rainbow world funds a powerful force, compassion, concern, rainbow world fund helps others by promoting philanthropy on cross the world and they have distributed 4 million dollars in humanitarian aid to communities in need around the world. let's hear it. ♪ i know that he thinks big, but i wonder if he thought that big that they would be going to cuba and helping one person at a time and tonight, helping kick off the holiday season in san francisco, welcome, founder and executive director of the rainbow world fund, jeff cauter. >> thanks donna and that great introduction and i must say that you look particularly fabulous tonight. >> if you are not familiar with the rainbow world fund we are an international service agency based in the gay and lesbian and transgender and friends community. so we are gay and straight people coming together. and what we do is we work within our community to educate people about issues of humanitarian aid and world need. and as we raise our community's consciousness, we fund and we raise funds to support relief efforts all around the world. our projects focus on, education, hunger, safe drinking water, and disaster relief, and all kinds of different ways of helping people. we have ongoing projects in cambodia, haiti, and south africa and helping out in areas just as the tsunami in south east asia and the earthquake and tsunami in japan and last year, and during hurricane katrina we tributed one mill object pounds of food aid. [ applause ] >> and all of that is coming from the lgbt and friends community. so we work as ambassadors for our community and we help change people's minds and hearts about who we are and what we care about. besides providing humanitarian aid, we try to inspire hope in all of our projects and we have found that hope is really just as important as aid, if not more so. and we have worked with a lot of communities in desperate situations arounded world and we found that providing a little bit of humanitarian aid and a lot of courage and hope it is amazing that people in desperate circumstances can do to improve theirs life. so seven years ago we really have a feeling that in the united states, we really need to increase our hope also. and we decided to do that by creating a global art project, the world, tree of hope. and what you see behind you is a live, 23-foot christmas tree and it is covered with 10,000 pieces of oragami and most of it is white cranes and all of the white cranes on the tree are inscribed with people's wish and hopes for the world. merilee put out an invitation that goes out virally through the internet and we ask people what they want for the future of the world and share it with us. and wishes are send in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys are here. the bridgemen. the left coast theatre. skip and the staff of martini's bar. yeah. and berny man and we had a bunch of burners helping us this year. yeah. and also, of course i would like to thank the mayor's office of neighborhood services and city hall events department. we worked them for seven years and they are always wonderful. and so thank you. >> it was his idea in the beginning. he must be very proud. that is a beautiful tree. and there are hundreds of cranes, when you look at it from here, it looks like it is snow-covered the tree. but you are in san francisco, that is not snow, those are oragami and each one has to be folded and it is an incredible project. i always thought of it as something that they just kind of did in class that you were bored, but no it is an art form and it makes a beautiful tree and behind all of that creativity is a person whose name was just mentioned. she has been here all seven years, linda mahara and she is a professional oragami artist. and you may know her work and not realize that you know her work. she has done professional training for febrese disney and pixar and she is here today because this is part of her labor of love, the world three of hope. let's welcome linda. mihara. >> thank you, donna, that is a wonderful introduction and you do look magnificent. >> you too. >> thank you >> this is a labor of love. this is my 7th year of participation, i get a call one day from jeff cauter and he said that he had this concept for the tree and he had heard about the tree about sadakal and it is a famous story that was true that was the inspiration for this tree. i came on board because i am the professional oragami artist and the story of sadako goes in japan if you have a wish that you want to have come true, you fold 1,000 cranes, and by the time that you have finished your 1,000th crane your wish will be granted so during the hiroshima bombing a girl became ill and had will leukemia, she passed before she finished, however her school mates completed the rest of the 1,000 that are buried with her. there is a monument to her at iroshima peace park. >> the celebrating of the cranes is celebrated worldwide. and this as an inspiration for this tree and how do we go about doing this? it is a big undertaking. we have so many volunteers, over the years, we have bridged the japanese and american community with the lgbt community and the chinese community and hispanic and it is really has been a community effort from the city. and it has been an amazing project. each crane takes about 30 folds to create. and we have over 10,000 ornaments on this tree this year and this year's tree is 23 feet tall, and it is four and a half feet taller than the white house tree. and it is the world's largest oragami tree. [ applause ] and it took 250 volunteers to prep the models everything has to be hand folded and wired and fire proofed and then, of course, decorated or placed on to the tree. it is really an amazing thing to look up close and think about what your hope and wishes for the world. we have given all the wishes wings and we hope that all of the wishes come true, especially the wishes of the children, thank you very much. anybody else just get chills? it gives so much more meaning to the tree. wow that is a lot of hours and i am not good at math but i think that it is a lot of hours, i can't imagine. and you have to love what you are doing. one more hand for linda and she does a wonderful job. it is really do get wishes from all over the world and we love to read some of them. we are going to have two people come up and read. but before they do, we got a late wish and just came across on beautiful stationary and we cannot fold it because it is on nancy pilosi sent us this message, each person puts in their wish for the world for the year and this is so well worded and if you know nancy it rings true. >> my wish is to live in a society where marriage equality is a reality for all and where all-american families are treated with dignity, and equality. [ applause ] the next two speakers are coming up together. we have a little school girl and a supervisor of san francisco, i bet that you will be able to tell which one is which. >> the 10-year-old girl is the president of her class at her elementary school and the larger person is a member of the board of supervisors. >> hang on hannah oconnel and scott weiner. [ applause ] >> so i am not hannah. i will be reading wishes tonight and alternate. the first is from sisters in gramic of the sisters of loreto my wish is that we achieve marriage equality in every state and we resend doma on the federal level to achieve full quality for lesbian and gay relationships across the land. >> i wish that the bees were not dying from. >> that is a good one. >> my hope is for improved economic conditions for my country's most vulnerable people that we create healthy environments and green spaces and by country men and women become fully conscious of their ability to change things for the better. >> baptist from haiti. my wish is for more justice, economic as well as social justice, starting with the recognition that poverty is not a sin. >> i wish for wish for a world without boarders and walls, age 53, argentina. [ applause ] >> i wish for a world where the children are more just and more kind and fair in the world than the one we know. president, barack obama. >> and now, this is a good one, that donna and i can very strongly identify with. i wish that male fashion designers would be forced to wear the things that they create for women like stelleto heals and it gets better. and that all politicians would have to live by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks, michael age 13 from long island, new york. >> free medical care for everyone, dorothy, age 72, new york, new york. >> i wish for all of the lonely people in the world to find happiness. daniel, steele, the author. >> i wish that we could bring all of our soldiers home now, anonomous. >> thank you, everyone. >> you can't make that stuff up, i tell you that was incredible, i know when the mayor leaves town they appoint a mayor for the day and i think that hannah should be the supervisor for the day when scott is out of town, thank you, hannah. >> okay, if you are following your program, throw it away or take it home with you so you know who was here today but he always have to change things around a little bit. i am thrilled that we have the mayor with us and we have the council general of japan with us and i want to bring them on so they can do the official thing that they have done for several years and exchange oragami decorations and kind of a symbolic friendship act here in city hall and don't forget that san francisco is where the united nations is was founded. one more thing that was very interesting to me this year the council general's wife coordinated the gathering of wishes for the tree of hope for 40 other consulates around the globe. >> thank you for doing that. the mayor of san francisco, the council general of japan and his name is... wait a minute, i have it. his name is heroshi, imamata. >> happy holidays everyone, welcome to the great city of san francisco, that dress, donna will make santa claus stay up all night. any way, i want to welcome everybody again to city hall, and to view our wonderful, wonderful tree of hope. it is something that i enjoy every year that it has been here and i tell you when it was announced that this was the tallest, largest tree of hope in the united states, if not in the world, i also wanted to say my very first thought was san francisco has always the biggest hearts in the world, thanks to all of you. thank you, donna, for your wonderful mc work here every year. and your beautiful presence. jeff carter, thank you very much, congratulations and thank you on behalf of everyone in the city, we are so proud of your work. karin that i have known for 30 years, thank you for you and all of the volunteers from the rainbow fund to put this together to place all of these 10,000 ornaments on the tree to give us the kind of attention that we would like not just because we have a great tree or city hall, but because we do always want to show our hearts first, especially during these holiday season. i know that is why, all of you are here tonight. and i want to also give a shout out to isabel iunda, thank you very much for being here, isabel. and linda mahara, thank you for your wonderful presentation, you know the stories that linda tells every year that updates us. these are the stories that i am proud of. because for every story that she has told about the original, the origin of origami, we inherit those stories and spread them to generations of our friends and children and so they understand what hope is about. >> halahanzo, and our san francisco, polorio. thank you for being here tonight. i also know that veronica klaus, thank you for being here. sisters, i was going to say the sisters of petulince. thank you for being here as well. [ applause ] and of course, you will hear and you have heard them earlier, our san francisco boys chorus, thank you, boys chorus for being here to celebrate. and then, tonight, many of you will be treated to goodies and some refreshments all donated through the world fund and their volunteers and all of the small businesses of san francisco. thank you for your wonderful donations during these holidays.
MSNBC
Dec 19, 2012 2:00am PST
both of the house members are relatively inexperience. the iraq war veteran gabbard just won her seat in november and has not been sworn in yet. it is not clear who will be on the list submitted by the state party. but we learned a very piece of important information. we learned before he died, the senator wrote a very personal letter to the governor asking should he die in office, he be replaced by congresswoman hanabusa. the passing of daniel inouye means there is one more to keep an eye on in hawaii. on september 11th the u.s. ambassador and three other americans were killed on a terrorist attack in libya. tuesday an independent review investigating the incident released its findings. a panel was highly critical of the state department saying they ignored arrests in tripoli for more guards and security upgrades relied who heavily on specific requests instead of security. and used unprotect militia to protect the compound. the report also found the attack was not the result of protests over anti-islamic video as first reported. in a letter to congress, secretary of state hillary clinton said she accepts all of the panel's 29 recommendations writing there is no higher priority for me or my department. >>> though there seems to be progress still no fiscal cliff deal in washington. house speaker john boehner said he has a backup plan. but that's not enough for one in three americans who according to a new survey are cutting back on spending due to fears of going over that cliff. nbc's tracie potts joins us now with more. good morning. >> reporter: mara, good morning. good morning, everyone. there is brand new evidence in that survey that americans are really feeling the squeeze before we've even gone over the cliff, plus republicans are changing their strategy. republicans are planning a vote as early as tomorrow to keep taxes low for everyone making up $1 million. >> going to have to go to plan "b." because we want to make sure we do not go off the cliff. >> everyone should understand boehner's proposal will not pass the senate. >> reporter: president obama offered a lower threshold, 400,000. >> the president has come halfway. he hopes that the republicans will do the same. >> reporter: republicans see this million dollar vote as a last-ditchest to save business o ditch effort to save business owners from taxes. >> i think everyone realizes the tax rate will go up. >> reporter: today in washington, experts discuss the impact on affordable housing and new this morning bankrate.com reports the threat of falling over the cliff already has one in three americans cutting back now, mostly poor families and seniors. >> enough is enough! >> reporter: some in washington urging congress to act. compromise seemed likely 24 hours ago now elusive as republicans push a vote that's not expected to ever reach the president's desk. actually two votes, because we're hearing there could be two separate votes when this comes up tomorrow, one to keep tax rates low for the middle class, and a separate vote to keep rate lows for everyone making under $1 million. >> tracie potts, thank you. >>> as democrats and republicans battle over the budget defense secretary leon panetta is making a last-minute plea to help avoid a fiscal disaster. speaking at the national press club yesterday, panetta suggested stripping out $74 billion in what he called needless spending on unnecessary weapons programs that have "outlived their usefulness." it's unclear whether lawmakers will consider so-called cuts the defense department will suffer $500 billion in automatic cuts which is panetta insists will make lasting damage on national defense. >>> the national rifle association ended its silence on the connecticut scoot shootings. it said it was shocked, saddened and heartbroken by the massacre and pledged to help make sure this never happens again. meanwhile more victims of friday's massacre were played to rest. jay gray has that story. >> reporter: the long, slow procession of funerals happens again in newtown. four more victims will be laid to rest, including teacher victoria soto. >> whatever actions they took to divert his attention, i'm sure they're the ones that responsible for her being here with us today. >> reporter: while this grieving community continues to remember and mourn the 26 who are not. >> there's no words. >> just deep sadness. just like -- just right down to the middle of all of us. >> reporter: grief counselors and extra security teams were at schools as class resumed in k w newto newtown, tuesday. sandy hook elementary has been closed. it's not clear when students will restart school, when they do, the classrooms will look the same as they did before the attack at monroe elementary. still everyone here knows they will never be the same. 20 friends, teammates, brothers and sisters will always be missing. jay gray, nbc news, newtown, connecticut. >>> now for a look at the weather including that winter storm making its way east, here is nbc meteorologist bill karins. good morning. >>> good morning. this storm will cause a lot of headaches. schools will be canceled in some cases. airports will have cancellations, too. this map shows the areas that will be effected. the pink showing the winter storm warnings. now we have brand new busily saad wa blizzard warnings from ames to des moines and central wisconsin. you will be dealing with your first blizzard of the season. where are we dealing with the problems this morning? only in the mountainous areas of central and western colorado, also some of the higher terrain there in arizona and new mexico. the storm will begin in earnest and intensify and become a headache as we go throughout the day today. the blue shows the snow. this is this morning. as we go throughout the day today, it blossoms. just clips the colorado area. denver two to four inches. later this afternoon, driving home in nebraska, very dangerous conditions. wind will be howling. heavy snow falling. as we go throughout the overnight hours, that's when the storm picks up in intensity. the dark blue shows where it will be hitting the hardest with blizzard conditions. tomorrow morning through iowa and wisconsin. tomorrow morning probably be like one of those days where you stay at home, do not travel. much of central iowa and south and central portions of wisconsin. the other side of this storm is the severe weather side. there's enough strong and severe weather out ahead of it, arkansas and missouri we can deal with the storm there. we will deal with lake-effect snow friday and saturday. how much snow are we talking about? that little area through central parts of nebraska, a possibility of a foot of snow. and ten inches possible for wisconsin down to central portions of iowa. finally we have to watch out for that severe weather threat. areas of yellow, late tonight into tomorrow morning, possibility of isolated tornadoes. watch out missouri, arkansas and louisiana. >> thank you very much. >> a little bit of everything. >> sounds nasty. thanks for that. >>> this next video is shocking. talk about a wild ride. this youtube video shows what appears to be a golden eagle swooping down on a child in canada and trying to fly away. though the child was dropped from the air, it wasn't hurt. golden eagles are one of the largest birds in north america. kills me to look at that. >>> two women sue over an extremely public cavity search caught on dash cam. >>> and the instagram controversy gets heat the. >>> and a jail break from 20 stories up. you're watching "first look." [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. >>> some stories making news this morning. there's a huge manhunt under way for two bank robbers who made a daring escape from downtown chicago's high-rise jail. they squeezed through a narrow window and scaled down about 12 stories using a makeshift rope and made their getaway. >>> michigan republican governor rick snyder detailed legislation that would have allowed weapons to be brought into churches, day care centers and schools. snyder says his decision was affected by friday's deadly shootings in connecticut. >>> an 11-year-old in utah said he brought an unloaded gun in his backpack to school to protect himself from an attack like the newtown shootings. the boy was detained on weapons charges even though no one was harmed. >>> nbc has learned that the late senator daniel inoue will lie in state at the u.s. capitol rotunda on thursday. that's a rare honor reserved for s presidents. >>> and instagram said it will remove from terms of service that would allowed photos to be sold and used as part of online advertisements. >>> now here's your "first look" at this morning's dish of scrambled politics. former south carolina governor mark sanford is thinking about a run to fill the congressional seat of tim scott who has been named to replace senator jim demint. also considering a run for the seat, his ex-wife jenny. the justice department decided not to charge paula broadwell with cyberstalking after the e-mail scandal that led petraeus to resign as cia director. >>> the movie "zero dark thirty" opened in theaters in new york and los angeles to positive reviews, but senator john mccain said the film is wrong because the waterboarding of khalid shaikh mohammed did not lead to information to osama bin laden's compound. >>> chris christie is the most favored republican candidate for the 2016 republican nomination in a new poll with 55%. >>> president obama's approval rating reached 57% in a cbs poll focusing on the fiscal cliff talks. >>> former republican senator chuck hagel is a top candidate to become the new defense secretary in the second obama administration, but there's some opposition questioning hagel's support for israel. >>> and ben affleck is reportedly on the list of possible successors if senator john kerry is nominated as secretary of state. affleck will be in washington today testifying before the house armed services committee about the security situation in congo is that's your morning dish of scrambled politics. >>> the dow saw its first back-to-back triple digit gains in five months tuesday. that was amid optimism that a deal will be reached on the fiscal cliff. today investors will be watching for fresh housing data and earnings from economic and holiday bellwether fedex. >>> this morning, swiss banking giant ubs announced it will pay a record $1.5 billion fine over its role in a global interest rate fixing scheme. >>> in the wake of the newtown massacre, cerberus is selling its majority stake in bushmaster firearms, the rifle used in friday's school shooting. >>> mark zuckerberg is making good on his promise to donate the majority of his wealth to charity, donating 18 million facebook shares worth about $500 million to the silicon valley community foundation. >>> oracle beat the street's estimates after the bell, and google's effort to put everything on the web, it's now boasting an online archive of high res images of the dead sea scroll dating from 1st century b.c. to 1st century a.d. >>> and follow-up on a sticky situation we told you about over the summer. police in canada charged two suspects in connection with an $18 million maple syrup heist in quebec. only about 70% of the loot was recovered which costs more per barrel than crude oil. police believe the rest was sold in the u.s. >>> a washington state woman survived an avalanche. nurses using robots to check up on patients. and out with the old. a 50-year-old power plant is razed to make way for new businesses in texas. you're watching "first look" on msnbc. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. 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(blowing sound) ask your doctor about spiriva. >>> here's your "first look" at some other news going on around america. in texas, two women are suing two state troopers after they say they endured roadside body cavity searches in full view of the public and without probable cause. the women were stopped for throwing a cigarette out of their car. but then the troopers claimed to smell marijuana which was never found. the women said they never intended for them to be touched or their car to be searched. a public safety official is also named in the suit. >>> a spectacular implosion in texas. it took just seconds to bring down a 50-year-old coal-fire power mant plant and smokestack as hundreds of spectators watched. it makes way for new businesses. >>> it may sound like something from "the jetsons" at a hospital, but nurses that are part robot and part web cam allows some nurses to check in on vital signs even miles away. it's new robot has been dubbed flo-bot in other than of florence nightingale. >>> a skier was rescued unharmed after searchers located her with metal poles. two men were all also partially buried but they managed to dig themselves out. >>> in denver a flash mob of kindness created some christmas miracles. a small group gathered in front of a local kmart to help the less fortunate, it helped to pelpa pay off layaway bills for some who might otherwise not have been able to pay. >>> jack pinto idolized cruz and he was buried in his jersey. cruz sent a tweet much love to the entire pinto family, great people with huge hearts. the dallas cowboys have banned josh brent from the sidelines after he attended the game sunday. he is charged in the drunk driving death of teammate jerry brown. >>> no love for tim tebow after the new york jets benchmark sanchez after throwing four picks in monday's loss to tennessee. he'll be replaced by third stringer greg mcelroy. >>> in the nba, nets gerald wallace missed the shot with three seconds left. the jazz held on for a 2-91 win. >>> and olympic snowboarder shaun white posted a video to youtube showing his long red hair being cut. the flying tomato is donating his trademark long hair to locks of love, the organization dedicated to helping children. >>> now for another look at the weather, here is nbc meteorologist bill karins with the weather channel forecast. >> feel weird, like giving my first big winter storm forecast. usually we have done a couple by now. this winter was slow starting. this will be the real deal. don't want to forget our friends up in maine, you are getting winter weather yourself. storm system is blowing in colder and and a lot of snow north of bangor, up towards caribou and presque isle. a few snow showers up in northern vermont. anyone traveling in the northeast, today looks just fine. thursday looks fine. friday morning looks like the travel trouble day, heavy rain and a few thunderstorms, but no snow or ice. as far as the snow forecast goes, it's a narrow band, so not a huge storm, but it will be very intense where it does travel and effect. it's mostly today in colorado, a minor impact for you. denver a couple inches. later today into tonight that we start to watch this storm intensify, the winds will be up to 40, 50 miles per hour, the heavy snow is this pink band. that's 6 to 12 inches of snow. much of central portions of nebraska an then through the heart of iowa, almost all of the big cities in iowa will be effected by this storm. blizzard warnings from ames, and green bay you will get it early tomorrow morning, all day thursday. the other part of this storm, if you're down there in areas from memphis to little rock, areas of louisiana, watch out for severe weather. one of those late night events. we could deal with a few tornados. that's late tonight into tomorrow morning. i think even at this time tomorrow morning i'll be telling you about strong thunderstorms rolling through the dope south. with all of that said, travel, airports, midwest through the deep south the next two days will be difficult. >>> if you missed last night's season finale of "the voice" we'll tell you the winner. >>> and ann hathaway had one unique request for the makers of le miz. >>> a 16-year-old kid in australia got busted for posing as a doctor at a hospital. they knew something was up after that one diagnosis, ew, gross. and finally a recent study found that people who like red wine are more outgoing than those who like white wine. and those who don't care what they drink are more likely to host the fourth hour of the "today" show. >>> anne hathaway brought specific requests to the set of "les mis." hathaway a hard-core vegan made sure all of her character's shoes were absolutely vegan friendly. the costume designer had to find very specific shoemakers to create those vegan boots and flats. >>> in a taped statement responding to the hollywood hacker who leaked nude pictures of her, scarlett johansson said she was truly humiliated and embarrassed by his perverted actions. the hacker was sentenced to ten years in prison. >>> kesha's song "die young," was pulled from many radio stations in the wake of the newtown school shootings. kesha tweeted i didn't want to singn those lyrics. i was forced to. the tweet was quickly deleted. >>> finally "the voice" crowned season three champ last night. >> the winner of season three of "the voice" is cassadee pope! congratulations! you have just won "the voice"! >> no better reason to watch than to see what cee lo green is wearing. >> "american idol" will start up soon. it is almost like you get the big, huge celebrity judges, it's almost like they're copying the voice. >> that helps people tune n it's like seeing britney spears on "the x factor." >> and "the voice" keeps doing better. >> i'm mara schiavocampo, "way too early" starts right now. >>> this is a difficult time for americans. that's why while we continue to have conversations with the white house, i've continued to
SFGTV
Dec 3, 2012 11:00am PST
as we getting to the vote here back in september about this program, and harm this program could cause, a lot of it misleading, and i expect that next year as we're doing our notification and education effort that we could experience similar misleading information. appreciate not from pg&e because. >> >> because they have to follow the code of conduct, but organizations related to pg&e. i am wondering how we're anticipating a response to such an effort to mislead and make beguile people in san francisco? >> we do expect we will have lots of questions from customers, and we're really hoping to encourage folks to the extent they have questions, they hear things that are concerning to talk to us. we really want an opportunity for folks to make an informed decision, and we will stay very true to the need to educate and not mislead. we hope that other participants in the dialogue will as well, but it will be a challenge for us to make sure folks are getting accurate information and really being educated about this choice. >> very good. thank you. let's go on to public comment. this is on these three items. i don't have any cards before me. we will do three minutes per person. >> good afternoon commissioners. eric brooks representing san francisco green party and the local grass-roots organization "our city". hopefully you have read the email, all of you that advocates sent. there are concerns about okaying this very kind of light framework today that doesn't have a lot of detail in it. i want to start out to get to those concerns about talking about what commissioner torres raised in the code of conduct with pg&e. we saw during the 2010 prop 16 attack on the clean energy programs and community choice in california that it didn't matter that pg&e didn't use rate payer funds they were able to argue that entire $46 million plus campaign was funded by their stockholders, so they are going to run a multi-million dollar robust campaign in san francisco against this program, and it looks like their plan to roll out the 100% green project hits about the same time we roll this out at the end of 2013. i think that's the timeline for them, and it's very important to note that if we go forward prematurely with a marketing plan that is not based on good robust outreach to people of color, low income communities, people of different languag seniors and also based on the 10, 11-dollar premium w pg&e electric is offering $6 the consumer is not going to understand and yeah that is cheaper but ours is better and to the consumer that is coke and pepsi and coke is six bucks and we cost 11 bucks and coke is pg&e the customer is going to pick pg&e and that comes to what i wanted to highlight in this the information that local power has been develop to link the build out with the price points and the marketing and the outreach we're going to be doing just has been put on the table and in lpi has shown that we can actually roll this program out even in phase one with competitive prices to pg&e, and that would profoundly change this entire outreach model. the rate fairness board when realized this information was coming forward postponed their decision to the sfpuc and we have to analyze that information and see if it will change the way we market the program before we okay the outreach plan. that is crucial. >> thank you. next speaker please. >> my name is francisco costa and envir -- environmental justice advocacy and many residents in the bay view participated in community choice aggregation and perhaps one person here in the auditorium that knows what i am talking about. michael [inaudible] lynn brown, jerad bloomfield and others. we make trips to sacramento and we do what we could in the bay view. we put solar on all 58 homes and so on and so forth. in the beginning of this discussion i heard something about climate change and then i was paying attention to this conversation and there's a lot of fluff. so much fluff it gives you a headache. now, if you look at a map and some of you have done the outreach, whatever way you did the outreach, if you want to pay attention to the carbon footprint you have to do anything for the people that are impacted in district 10 and 11 and if you haven't done that to the best of your ability you have failed, so don't tell us in the areas that are green, which is where mostly the rich people live, where they send all their garbage, where they send all their sewage to which is in district 10 and you do service -- when it comes to outreach. that has to be ratified immediately. now, we need empirical data from this so-called consultants because sfpuc has this habit to have consultants. we saw this when they tried to put the combustion turbines and seen it again and again and the emphasis is on consultants so sfpuc has to learn in san francisco where we have many advocates and environmentalists that we need to have san franciscans doing the outreach for san francisco, and we will be paying attention to this and once we notice something -- which we have been doing we will write about t now, clean energy has to be discussed in the various facets that clean energy is produced. not only here in the united states but brazil and other areas and to find out really how much does that cost and finally let me say mr. chairman that we do have hydro electricity as part of this and we need to see how that is implemented. thank you very much. >> thank you. i have -- additional cards to name? jessica dur man ackerman and david mccord. >> hi. i am jessica ackerman and conservation staff with the sierra club and i am here to represent the 30,000 members in the bay area. i want to thank the supervisors for talking about the importance of this program and climate change and the importance of the program at for outreach. this is opportunity for economic growth but only if it includes local build out and we're seeing strong benefits and the installation of clean energy, energy efficiency, and leveraging other regional sources and we are concerned that the pln has a stagnant rate of power on the open market and -- dear the duration of the shell contract. a proposal is being delivered right now that will shape or improve the developments and resources and financial modeling and make the economy more sustainable and provide economic benefits to our people and effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions. the way cleanpower sf has passed the board of supervisors is as opt out program and the language used in the outreach plan changes the character of the program the way the legislators envisioned it when passing cleanpower sf. we are concerned changing it in way discourages residents and more cost to the ratepayers. we hope we can take the basic structure of the document and required notifications and adjustments and also engages residents in civil discourse and community power but the lifetime of this program. thank you very much. >> thank you. i have one other card. anyone else that would like to comment please come forward. thank you. >> i am david mccord and el cerrito and the chair of the sierra club bay chapter energy subcommittee, and the bottom line is that the plan is not yet ready for approval. for one thing the staff needs to fill in the details about just how you're going to reach out to the various communities in the city. supervisor olague that touched on that. and second the plan does not take into account the impacts of the roll out and pricing scenarios being developed by local power which you have contracted with to do this, and the rate fairness board wants to study these before recommending the rates which will affect what you tell people in your surveys and outreach. so we respectively ask that you direct the staff to return to you in december or january with a really detailed outreach program that clarifies the outreach strategy and integrates local build out and jobs, and infrastructure and incomes into pricing and outreach. thank you. >> hi folks. nice to see you all again. i think it's been a number of months since i addressed you briefly. of course i speak on behalf of the advocates and we have been very actively involved in this issue and we sent you this later with our considered opinion which i hope you take seriously, serious reservations that we have as advocates representing the community with this particular plan. i want to give personal feelings about this. i respect all my friends on this part of the table and i don't know how they convinced themselves what they're talking about makes sense to anybody but themselves. i mean we're talking about doing surveys and reaching out to 20,000 people and red and green and wait list. we need 60 to 90,000 people in the program. there is no discussion how we go from the 20,000 people and might indicate an interest and roll it out to them and how you get to the 60,000 to 90,000 people and so everybody can opt out. i don't know if they convinced themselves that's great but if they can convince you this makes sense i don't know it's a sad day. it's going to cost $1.4 million to try and sell something that no one in their right mind can sell. it's like dressing up a pig in princess clothes and we're going to go on a door step and explain some way or another how our 100% green is more costly coming from shell north america and arguably the largest climate criminal and more green and pg&e product. that's called the same thing. if you think you can sell that -- well, i think you're going to need $5 million probably per person. it's just ridiculous. when you have a good product you don't need to spend millions of dollars to sell it. that's the bottom line. and you paid $400,000 to have people come and look at this and say "well, here are some real alternatives". the alternatives are not only long-term alternatives to develop a program that bills 51% renewables within five years, communicate shares program and interest people in investing in this build out program. that even provides scenarios that hetch hetchy power could be used right from the beginning to mitigate the price increases, and moving ahead like this never happened. we're having discussions in the stakeholders meetings and other places and how to incorporate this new information. why in the world would you not do that? >> thank you very much. any other member of the public who would like to comment on these items please come forward? and seeing no one come forward we will close public comment. i want to thank puc and ms. hale for your presentation. thank you very much and i really appreciate the work that has been put together in developing the framework for outreach. i actually really believe that we need to move forward quickly as a city. i want to make sure we're successful in the program. while we don't have all the details of the early notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wanted to comment that i agree with mr. brooks that the onslaught of opposition that this campaign probably has to deal with will be very severe and i think certainly -- there is the ledgeally ballot in the bay and prop eight and there were ballots in the bay never counted and all of that and who knows? it could be true obviously. there is a website "change.org" and misinformed about shell oil and it's connection to this program and maybe it's not completely misinformed but certainly under lying there is no mention of clean power and how we have no currently and relying completely i will say hard energy sources and fossil fuels and that sort of thing, and even in my own personal campaign there was a hit piece that came out about how i was in bed with shell oil and nigeria and active vifts there and we know that is true and disappearing and what not and i don't think we should under estimate the type of political quagmire that this program will find itself in and the attacks are unwarranted and misinforming and certainly i'm not suggesting they're all coming from pg&e, but certainly there is a motivation to maintain the monopoly they have held in the city around providing energy, so with that being said i just wanted to close my comments and i am glad next week i think we're at lafco hearing the task force recommendations. that is critical and sometimes we pass the policies and our actions never conform with the policies that we pass, so if we're serious about reaching that goal in 10 years i think we really need to get serious and that's why cleanpower sf is so important, but in closing i want to go back again and harp on my jimmy carter issue of earlier and i'm going to take this quote. it says "soon after jimmy carter installed solar panels on the white house. a generation from now i think this is in the 70's or early 80's the solar heater can be a surcosity, a museum piece, a example of a road not taken, or a small part of one of the greatest adventures under taken by the american people and harness the power of the sun and move away from the crippling dependence on foreign oil, and again at that point we can say that the solar panels were a museum piece. i am hoping cleanpower sf isn't this interesting idea that creeped up and disappeared because of all the misinformation and whatever that certain interests will probably have in seeing this sort of plan not succeed, so again when i was 16 my first venture into politics was through this group called "people for safe energy" in fresno and i was 17 and our first venture was to go to the power plant and protest the fact they wanted to have a nuclear power plant sitting next to an earthquake fault. in japan i think the conversation around nuclear power is shifting again and there are challenges to it and this is not new. this conversation has been around forever and that is pg&e and nuclear power and all of that and here we are in 2012 still having the conversation, so i mean i wouldn't under estimate again the type of opposition, however subtle or not, that this program is going to have to conwith. that's why it's critical how we accurately inform people in the city around the value of this program. >> thank you commissioner olague. president carter also wore a button down sweater when he made that statement. >> did he? >> it's important to note that ronald regan removed those solar panels from the white house. i am unclear on the agenda and on ours it doesn't mention any possible action item, but on the document for the public utilities commission it does and i think we want to make sure we're either today or the next puc meeting but i hope that's the plan, the framework of the plan can be adopted. >> i would like to make a comment. >> commissioner torres. >> first of all i never believed the hit pieces against you commissioner olague. >> thank you. >> and the man that defeated carter thought redwood trees caused pollutions and number three i don't think the staff is naive and to suggest that is inappropriate. they have been working very hard in this effort -- >> i -- >> i'm not talking about you. i am talking general in response. i believe the process is organic and i believe they do take into consideration every input as possible and this process and i know the chair and the other members of the commission know is not over yet. it is still evolving and that is an important element to put out there. this process is still evolving and organ and i can need continued input to whatever surveys and approaches we take are reflective of those issues and the other issue raised is san franciscans should be doing outreach in this support and i can't support that more than enough because it's always my experience that sometimes we bring in outside forces -- not that we have here, but outside forces that don't know the community, communities of color and speak other languages and in addition to english and those are sensitive issues i think the staff has taken into consideration and that's an important statement to make. i appreciate your comments and i read your letter and i appreciate the comments but i think it's important to keep within the context of how the staff and commission has operated and quite frankly how members of the board of supervisors has operated with the best of intentions because at the end of the day we're accountable to the tax payers and the rate payers of city and county of san francisco. >> thank you president torres. just a clarification on the action item before us if there is one or for the later meet something. >> the sfpuc commission agenda provides for them to discuss and take action, so our understanding is that the commission secretary would call the roll for the sfpuc so that they could vote on this agenda item for lafco it was just a discussion item. >> thank you. commissioner vietor. >> yes and i appreciate all the public comments that have been made and the comments too from this body and all of the work that the puc has done. i have been on the public utilities commission for four years plus and i know this cleanpower sf issue -- i think it's been eight years, nine years in the coming, and when i came on there was really this sort of sense that the puc wasn't stepping up, that the city didn't care that we weren't moving quickly enough and he we are at this opportunity to really move things forward. i think it's really remarkable and i think we all now recognize with hurricane sandy, with the inclement weather and the winter we're having now that climate change and renewable power and local energy provision is paramount and we need to main ain and amplify that commitment as a city. i also continue to have my eye on the prize of the local build out and the promise of that because i think not only is the job opportunity great, and all kinds of implications around work force training and at the local level and diversify that source and needs to be local and hurricane sandy has shown us that. that if there were nor localized power 4,000 people wouldn't be out of power right now so i am supportive of moving forward as quickly as possible with the education and outreach that needs to happen. i also concur with president torres and this is organic and evolving and this financing piece is really an important discussion to have and i would welcome having that with the lafco to talk about if the possibility of local build out over this four year contract could reduce the rates and the question of the bond and $4 million bond and i would love for the cfo at the puc look at that and give a briefing on that, so i am wondering in short order we're . -- we couldn't have this presentation and understanding we're going door to door and putting numbers out there into the community but i think that needs to happen. this program needs to move forward. it's been a long time. not just with this program, but as we heard from the installation of the first solar power in the 70's it's time to take action and move forward so thank you very much. >> thank you. commissioner mo ran. >> thank you, just a couple quick comments. first is that when the item comes before the commission at our next meeting in order to lift the funding cap i think that is an appropriate time for staff or davis and associates to respond to some of the issues raised today and specific outreach to communities of color. secondly, i do understand that the local power has submitted at least a first major draft of their proposal that that's being reviewed by puc staff. i have seen some of the initial work, both the submission and the staff response on that. i think that's important that it proceed and proceed quickly. i am in favor of moving forward with this program as proposed in part to keep the pressure on that activity and not shelfd and ignored and that it's addressed and responded to completely, so when we have a presentation it be one frankly not just by local power but also by local power and staff. hopefully having come to some agreement as to what those numbers are and what they mean for us that we can have a complete discussion about that, so i think it is organic and moving and we need to keep the pressure on moving it quickly. >> okay. thank you. colleagues any other comments or questions? okay. i think so the puc commissioners do have an action item and i will hand over the gavel to the president of the commission to carry out their decision. >> commissioner moran. >> thank you mr. president. i would like to move the resolution of this in front of us. >> is there a second? >> second. >> moved and seconded. any opposition? any discussion? any public comment? called roll. >> president torres. >> aye. >> commissioner. >> aye. commissioner. >> aye. >> motion carries. i think we're adjourned. >> okay. very good. thank you very much. i am very excited to see that go forward. thank you commissioners. let's go
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